A Good Agreement Em Portugues

Over time, the Lisbon Academy of Sciences and the Brazilian Academy of Letters successively conducted attempts to establish a common spelling between the two countries. The first agreement was concluded in 1931; However, as the vocabularies published in 1940 (in Portugal) and 1943 (Brazil) continued to contain some discrepancies, a new meeting was held, which created the spelling agreement of 1945. This agreement entered into force in Portugal by Decree 35.288/45. [2] In Brazil, the 1945 agreement was approved by Decree-Law 8.286/45, but it was never ratified by the National Congress and repealed by Law 2.623/55, so that Brazilians obtained the rules of the 1943 agreement. Other attempts failed in 1975 – partly at the time of the political upheaval in Portugal, at the Revolutionary Process in Progress (PREC) – and in 1986 because of the reaction provoked in both countries by the removal of accents written in the words paroxyton. Angola has not yet signed the agreement and has asked other PALOP countries to help it discuss various points of this agreement with Portugal. [3] [4] For the elaboration of the Agreement, the following delegations met at the Lisbon Academy of Sciences from 6 to 12 October 1990: in 1911, after the creation of the Portuguese Republic, a vast spelling reform – the spelling reform of 1911 – completely changed the face of the written language and brought it closer to the contemporary debate. As for the different spellings like anĂ³nimo and anĂ´nimo, facto and fato, both are considered legitimate depending on the dialect of the author or person who is transcribed. The agreement also defines certain common guidelines for the use of dashes and outlines, which have yet to be developed and defined in a common vocabulary.

The content and legal value of the treaty have not been the subject of a consensus among linguists, philologists, scientists, journalists, writers, translators and personalities from the arts, politics and economics of Brazilian and Portuguese society. . . .